Home Podcasts THMG103 – Tier II Reporting for New York City Explained

THMG103 – Tier II Reporting for New York City Explained

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Bob recently came across an interesting report on the Tier II reporting for the NYC area. Some of the numbers were a total shock to Bob, so he decided to throw Mike under the bus and see what he knew. Of course, Bob had all of the answers in front of him, and Mike did not. Hilarity ensues.

Complete Show Notes

3:20 What is Tier II Reporting?

  • Covered under the NYC Community Right-to-Know Program and Title III of the Superfunds Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA)
  • Goes through Tier II reporting chemicals for NYC that are established by DERTA, which is the NYC DEP’s Division of Emergency Response and Technical Assessment Team
  • Comprehensive inventory of information collected by the Right-to-Know program includes:
    • Facility inventory forms
    • Safety data sheets (SDS) for each reportable chemical
    • Risk management plans (RMP), if required
    • Site plans indicating storage locations
    • Notice of accidental spills and releases
    • Extremely hazardous substance and regulated toxic substance reports
    • Names of emergency coordinators at extremely hazardous substance facilities
  • Information contained within the CFID is often used by the NYPD, FDNY, and NYC Office of Emergency Management

7:05 Important Statistics

  • Of the 4,956 hazardous substances regulated by the NYC Community Right-to-Know program, only 590 are considered to be extremely hazardous substances (EHS)
  • There are 11,222 facilities reporting annually in New York City
  • Breakdown of responses per the NYC DEP in fiscal year 2017:
    • 41% were responses to reports of chemical odors
    • 22% were petroleum spills
    • 12% were abandoned chemicals
    • 11% were responses to special investigations
    • 10% were responses to chemical spills

13:45 Top 20 Extremely Hazardous Substances and Number of Incidents Reported

  • 1. Sulfuric acid (9,734)
  • 2. Formaldehyde (1,100)
  • 3. Hydrofluoric acid (506)
  • 4. Phenol (388)
  • 5. Hydrogen peroxide (360)
  • 6. Ammonia (255)
  • 7. Vinyl acetate (246)
  • 8. Sodium azide (228)
  • 9. Nitric acid (189)
  • 10. Hydroquinone (173)
  • 11. Chloroform (164)
  • 12. Hydrochloric acid (115)
  • 13. Potassium cyanide (96)
  • 14. Acrylamide (93)
  • 15. Propylene oxide (82)
  • 16. Pyrene (76)
  • 17. Sodium cyanide (71)
  • 18. Mercuric chloride (68)
  • 19. Cyclohexylamine (51)
  • 20. Aniline (48)

23:10 Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) Data

  • In accordance with Part 313 of Title III of SARA, companies and facilities within New York City must file their Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) data
  • The North American Industry Classification System code ranges from Sections 31-33
  • Facilities that meet the following criteria are required to submit TRI data:
    • In the manufacturing, industrial, and power generation sectors
    • Ten or more full-time employees
    • Manufacture or process 25,000 pounds or use at least 10,000 pounds of a listed toxic chemical each year
  • The top five toxic chemicals release in New York City are:
    • Ammonia
    • Toluene
    • Xylene (mixed isomers)
    • 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene
    • Naphthalene
  • These substances represent more than 97% of the total reported releases by weight – ammonia alone represents 96% of the total reported released

25:10 1. Sulfuric Acid

  • Sulfuric acid is found all over the place in New York City – one major source is batteries used by the telecommunications industry
  • Other sources include:
    • Adhesives and sealant chemicals
    • Adsorbents and absorbents
    • Agricultural chemicals (non-pesticidal)
    • Bleaching agents
    • Corrosion inhibitors and anti-scaling agents
    • Dyes
    • Fuels and fuel additives
    • Functional fluids (open and closed systems)
    • Intermediates
    • Ion exchange agents
    • Laboratory chemicals
    • Oxidizing/reducing agents
    • Photosensitive chemicals
    • Pigments
    • Plasticizers
    • Plating agents and surface treating agents
    • Process regulators
    • Processing aids specific to petroleum production
    • Processing aids not otherwise listed
    • Propellants and blowing agents
    • Solids separation agents
    • Solvents (for cleaning and degreasing)
    • Solvents (that become part of product formulation or mixture)
    • Surface active agents

27:15 2. Formaldehyde

  • Used mostly as a chemical intermediate – also used in agriculture, as an analytical re-agent, in concrete and plaster additives, cosmetics, disinfectants, fumigants, photography, and wood preservation
  • One of the most common uses of formaldehyde in the United States is manufacturing urea-formaldehyde resins used in particleboard products

27:50 3. Hydrofluoric Acid

  • Used in the electronic and chemical industries and for glass etchings
  • Also used frequently in the production of aluminum and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs)
  • Also used when separating uranium isotopes, as a catalyst in the petroleum industry, and in stainless steel pickling
  • Fluoride is sometimes added to public drinking water supplies and is used in a number of dental products

28:40 4. Phenol

  • Sources include:
    • Abrasives
    • Adhesives and sealant chemicals
    • Flame retardants
    • Fuels and fuel additives
    • Intermediates
    • Ion exchange agents
    • Laboratory chemicals
    • Odor agents
    • Solvents

29:10 5. Hydrogen Peroxide

  • Sources include:
    • Bleaching agents
    • Intermediates
    • Oxidizing/reducing agents
    • Plating and surface treating agents
    • Solvents (for cleaning and degreasing)

29:50 6. Ammonia

  • Sources include:
    • Adsorbents and absorbents
    • Agricultural chemicals (non-pesticidal)
    • CBI
    • Corrosion inhibitors and anti-scaling agents
    • Finishing agents
    • Fuels and fuel additives
    • Functional fluids (closed systems)
    • Intermediates
    • Oxidizing/reducing agents
    • Plasticizers
    • Process regulators
    • Processing aids (not otherwise listed)
    • Solvents (which become part of product formulation or mixture)

31:05 7. Vinyl Acetate

  • Used as a raw material in the production of other chemicals
  • Also used in adhesives, water-based paints, non-woven textile fibers, textile sizings and finishes, paper coatings, inks, films, and lacquers

31:15 8. Sodium Azide

  • Commonly found in herbicides

32:10 9. Nitric Acid

  • Sources include:
    • Agricultural products (non-pesticidal)
    • Building and construction materials not covered elsewhere
    • Electrical and electronic products
    • Explosive materials
    • Fabric, textile, and leather products not covered elsewhere
    • Foam seating and bedding products
    • Laundry and dishwashing products
    • Lawn and garden care products
    • Metal products not covered elsewhere
    • Personal care products
    • Photographic supplies, film, and photochemicals
    • Plastic and rubber products not covered elsewhere
    • Water treatment products

32:45 10. Hydroquinone

  • Commonly found in photographic supplies, film, and photochemicals

33:05 11. Chloroform

  • Used in the past as an extraction solvent for fats, oils, greases, and other products
  • Chloroform was also used as a dry-cleaning spot remover and as an anesthetic
  • Could also be found in fire extinguishers and as a fumigant
  • No longer used in any of these products today – now used as a solvent in industry

33:50 12. Hydrochloric Acid

  • Sources include:
    • Adsorbents and absorbents
    • Agricultural chemicals (non-pesticidal)
    • Bleaching agents
    • CBI
    • Corrosion inhibitors and anti-scaling agents
    • Finishing agents
    • Functional fluids (closed systems)
    • Intermediates
    • Ion exchange agents
    • Laboratory chemicals
    • Odor agents
    • Oxidizing/reducing agents
    • Pigments
    • Plating and surface treating agents
    • Process regulators
    • Processing aids specific to petroleum production
    • Processing aids, not otherwise listed
    • Solids separation agents
    • Solvents (for cleaning or degreasing)
    • Solvents (which become part of product formulation or mixture)

34:05 13. Potassium Cyanide

  • Used commercially for fumigation, electroplating, and extracting gold and silver from ores
  • Hydrogen cyanide gas released by potassium cyanide has a distinctive bitter almond odor

34:35 14. Acrylamide

  • Sources include:
    • Acrylamide
    • Adhesives and sealant chemicals
    • Intermediates
    • Paint additives and coating additives not described by other categories
    • Processing aids specific to petroleum production
    • Processing aids, not otherwise listed
    • Solids separation agents

34:45 15. Propylene Oxide

  • Used in the production of polyethers (primary component of polyurethane foams) and propylene glycol (food additive)
  • Clear, colorless, volatile liquid with an ethereal odor

36:25 16. Pyrene

  • Commonly used in biochemical research

36:30 17. Sodium Cyanide

  • Highly poisonous compound that’s an inhibitor of many metabolic processes
  • Used as a test re-agent for the function of chemoreceptors
  • Other sources include:
    • Building and construction materials not covered elsewhere
    • Electrical and electronic products
    • Metal products not covered elsewhere

36:35 18. Mercuric Chloride

  • Used in photography, disinfectants, wood preservatives, and fungicides

36:45 19. Cyclohexylamine

  • Used in paints, coatings, and water treatment products

36:50 20. Aniline

  • Used to manufacture other chemicals, like dyes, photographic chemicals, and agricultural chemicals

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